Censorship
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The Comoros are an African archipelago country with a population of less than 1 million in the Indian Ocean which practices Islam.

General censorship[]

Although the 2001 Constitution, revised in 2018, guarantees press freedom, Comorian journalists routinely censor themselves because of the heavy penalties for defamation. A new information law was adopted in 2021 and a journalistic ethics commission was created. But, despite these provisions, journalists are still often pressured to reveal their sources while in police custody.

In the Comoros archipelago, journalists are still often subjected to intimidation and arrest, especially during elections.

Accustomed to controlling state media, succeeding governments have yet to come to terms with freedom of expression in the privately owned media, making censorship and arrests of journalists and bloggers still common. When the finance minister took office in 2021, he threatened to use “thugs” to “rip to pieces” any journalists who criticised him. A few months before that, the president’s communications coordinator, a renowned former journalist, recognised the existence of a “political culture that will have to change radically.”

As conservative religious influence is on the wane, the media increasingly cover subjects related to sex and prostitution, with the public’s support.

Book censorship[]

La Gazette des Comores, a privately owned daily, and the state-owned Al Watwan newspaper are very popular. But a great deal of news and information circulates online, especially on social media, where people can be more outspoken although the reporting often falls far short of meeting journalistic standards.

As conservative religious influence is on the wane, the media increasingly cover subjects related to sex and prostitution, with the public’s support.

Movie censorship[]

  • Ben-Hur - this film was banned from all Arab League states due to actress Haya Harareet being Israeli.
  • Borat - This film was banned in every Arab League country (including the Comoros), except Lebanon.

Internet censorship[]

Television censorship[]

The Office de Radio et Télé des Comores (ORTC),  the only public, free and national TV channel, is regarded as pro-government but has a large audience.

Video game censorship[]

External links[]

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